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Non-governmental organization

Non-governmental organizations, nongovernmental[1] organizations, or nongovernment organizations,[2][3] commonly referred to as NGOs,[4] are usually non-profit and sometimes international organ Non-governmental organizations, nongovernmental[1] organizations, or nongovernment organizations,[2][3] commonly referred to as NGOs,[4] are usually non-profit and sometimes international organizations[5] independent of governments and international governmental organizations (though often funded by governments)[6] that are active in humanitarian, educational, health care, public policy, social, human rights, environmental, and other areas to affect changes according to their objectives.[7][8][9][10] They are thus a subgroup of all organizations founded by citizens, which include clubs and other associations that provide services, benefits, and premises only to members. Sometimes the term is used as a synonym of "civil society organization" to refer to any association founded by citizens,[11] but this is not how the term is normally used in the media or everyday language, as recorded by major dictionaries. The explanation of the term by NGO.org (the non-governmental organizations associated with the United Nations) is ambivalent. It first says an NGO is any non-profit, voluntary citizens' group which is organized on a local, national or international level, but then goes on to restrict the meaning in the sense used by most English speakers and the media: Task-oriented and driven by people with a common interest, NGOs perform a variety of service and humanitarian functions, bring citizen concerns to Governments, advocate and monitor policies and encourage political participation through provision of information.[12] NGOs are usually funded by donations, but some avoid formal funding altogether and are run primarily by volunteers. NGOs are highly diverse groups of organizations engaged in a wide range of activities, and take different forms in different parts of the world. Some may have charitable status, while others may be registered for tax exemption based on recognition of social purposes. Others may be fronts for political, religious, or other interests. Since the end of World War II, NGOs have had an increasing role in international development,[13] particularly in the fields of humanitarian assistance and poverty alleviation.[14] The number of NGOs worldwide is estimated to be 10 million.[15] Russia had about 277,000 NGOs in 2008.[16] India is estimated to have had around 2 million NGOs in 2009, just over one NGO per 600 Indians, and many times the number of primary schools and primary health centres in India.[17][18] China is estimated to have approximately 440,000 officially registered NGOs.[19] About 1.5 million domestic and foreign NGOs operated in the United States in 2017.